Heidegger’s Opposition to Sartre

Heidegger’s critique of Sartre’s misreading of Being and Time is imparted in “Letter on Humanism” (1946), as a direct response to a letter from one of Sartre’s followers, Jean Braufret. Heidegger’s “Letter” distances himself from Sartre’s existentialism philosophically and, more importantly, questions humanism in particular because, according to Heidegger, “every humanism is either grounded in … Continue reading Heidegger’s Opposition to Sartre

An Unlikely Association with Heidegger

Though any association between Martin Heidegger and posthumanism may seem unlikely, I must admit, as a disclaimer, that such an association is not obvious. In fact, perhaps, it is certainly more likely to assume that Heidegger and posthumanism have absolutely nothing in common, and that the Heidegger’s preoccupations and the posthumanist concerns are mutually exclusive. … Continue reading An Unlikely Association with Heidegger

Sin, Alienation, and the Being of God

(Theological) Sin, as a form of alienation, can be extrapolated from Heideggerian notion of “being-in-the-world.”[1] By way of this approach, sin can, in turn, be defined as “being tempted and being tranquilized”[2] to the point that being human becomes being alienated, where “this [overriding] alienation drives [the sinner] into a kind of Being which borders … Continue reading Sin, Alienation, and the Being of God

“Dasein and Temporality” in Division II of Being and Time (1927)

Division II of Being and Time begins with the header entitled “Dasein and Temporality,” announcing “the outcome of the preparatory fundamental analysis of Dasein,” which is oriented towards “the task of a primordial existential interpretation of [Dasein]” (274). What follows, though, is a brief review—or recapitulation—of the sum of Division I, culminating in “[an] understanding … Continue reading “Dasein and Temporality” in Division II of Being and Time (1927)

From Division I Chapter 5 (and Further) of Being and Time (1927)

Upon entering Chapter 5 of Division One, particularly after establishing the basic state of Dasein as “being-in-the-world,” Heidegger contends that “our first aim is to bring into relief phenomenally the unitary primordial structure of Dasein’s Being, in terms of which its possibilities and the ways for it ‘to be’ are ontologically determined.” What Heidegger’s “first … Continue reading From Division I Chapter 5 (and Further) of Being and Time (1927)

Husserlian and Cartesian Pathmarks in Division I of Being and Time (1927)

Following Heidegger’s “Introduction,” which is meant to set up his theoretical approach to Being and Time, Heidegger presents the term “Dasein.” This special term not only has implications in the original German as “being-there,” but contains particular resonance as “human being.” In both cases, Dasein construes human existence through “being-ness,” and it is that “being-ness” … Continue reading Husserlian and Cartesian Pathmarks in Division I of Being and Time (1927)